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Alabama — 1901

We, the people of the State of Alabama, in order to establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God, do ordain and establish the following Constitution...


Alaska — 1956

We, the people of Alaska, grateful to God and to those who founded our nation and pioneered this great land ...


Arizona — 1911

We, the people of the State of Arizona, grateful to Almighty God for our liberties, do ordain this Constitution ...


Arkansas — 1874

We, the people of the State of Arkansas, grateful to Almighty God for the privilege of choosing our own form of government ...


California — 1879

We, the People of the State of California, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom ...


Colorado — 1876

We, the people of Colorado, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of Universe ...


Connecticut — 1818

The People of Connecticut, acknowledging with gratitude the good Providence of God in permitting them to enjoy ...

Article I, Sec. 3. The exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship, without discrimination, shall forever be free to all persons in this state, provided that the right hereby declared and established shall not be so construed as to excuse acts of licentiousness, or to justify practices inconsistent with the peace and safety of the state.

Article I, Sec. 4. No preference shall every be given by law to any Christian sect or mode of worship.

Article VII, Sec. 1. It being the duty of all men to worship the Supreme Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the Universe, and their right to render that worship in the mode most consistent with the dictates of their consciences: no person  shall, by law, be compelled to join or support, nor be classed with, or associated to, any congregation, church, or religious association. But every person now belonging to such congregation, church, or religious association, shall remain a member thereof, until he shall have separated himself therefrom, in the manner hereinafter provided. And each and every society and denomination of Christians in this state, shall have and enjoy the same and equal powers, rights, and privileges: and shall have the power and authority to support and maintain the ministers or teachers of their respective denominations, and to build and repair houses for public worship, by a tax on the members of any such society only, to be laid by a major vote of the legal voters assembled at any society meeting, warned and held according to law, or in any other manner.

Article VII, Sec. 2 If any person shall choose to separate himself from the society or denomination of Christians to which he may belong, and shall leave a written notice thereof with the clerk of such society, he shall thereupon no longer be liable for any future expenses which may be incurred by said society.


Delaware — 1776

Through Divine Goodness all men have, by nature, the rights of worshipping and serving their Creator according to the dictates of their consciences ...

Article XXII Every person who shall be chosen a member of either house, or appointed to any office or place of trust... shall... make and subscribe the following declaration, to wit: I, _________ do profess faith in God the Father, and in the Lord Jesus Christ His only Son, and in the Holy Ghost, one God and blessed forever more; and I do acknowledge the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments to be given by divine inspiration.


Florida — 1885

We, the people of the State of Florida, grateful to Almighty God for our constitutional liberty ... establish this Constitution ...


Georgia — 1798

We, the people of Georgia, relying upon protection and guidance of Almighty God, do ordain and establish this Constitution ...

Article II, Sec. 9 Divorces shall not be granted by the legislature, until the parties shall have a fair trial before the superior court, and a verdict shall have been obtained, authorizing a divorce upon legal principles. And in such cases, two–thirds of each branch of the legislature may pass acts of divorce accordingly.

Article IV, Sec. 10 No person within this state shall, upon any pretense, be deprived of the inestimable privilege of worshipping God in a manner agreeable to his own conscience, nor be compelled to attend any place of worship contrary to his own faith and judgment; nor shall he every be obliged to pay tithes, taxes, or any other rate, for the building or repairing of any place of worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or ministry, contrary to what he believes to be right, or has voluntarily engaged himself to do. No one religious sect shall every be established in this state, in preference to any other; nor shall any person be denied the enjoyment of any civil right, merely on account of his religious principles.


Hawaii — 1959

We, the people of Hawaii, Grateful for Divine Guidance ... establish this Constitution ...


Idaho — 1889

We, the people of the State of Idaho, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings ...


Illinois — 1870

We, the people of the State of Illinois, grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy and looking to Him for a blessing on our endeavors ...


Indiana — 1851

We, the People of the State of Indiana, grateful to Almighty God for the free exercise of the right to chose our form of government ...


Iowa — 1857

We, the People of the State of Iowa, grateful to the Supreme Being for the blessings hitherto enjoyed, and feeling our dependence on Him for a continuation of these blessings ... establish this Constitution ...


Kansas — 1859

We, the people of Kansas, grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious privileges ... establish this Constitution ...


Kentucky — 1891

We, the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberties ...


Louisiana — 1921

We, the people of the State of Louisiana, grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberties we enjoy ...


Maine — 1820

We the People of Maine ... acknowledging with grateful hearts the goodness of the Sovereign Ruler of the Universe in affording us an opportunity ... and imploring His aid and direction ...


Maryland — 1776

We, the people of the state of Maryland, grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious liberty ...

That, as it is the duty of every man to worship God in such manner as he thinks most acceptable to him; all persons professing the Christian religion, are equally entitled to Protection in their religious liberty; wherefore no person ought by any law to be molested...

...required "a declaration of a belief in the Christian religion" for all state officers.


Massachusetts — 1780

We...the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging with grateful hearts, the goodness of the Great Legislator of the Universe... in the course of His Providence, an opportunity ... and devoutly imploring His direction ...

Part I, Article 2. It is the right, as well as the duty, of all men in society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the Supreme Being, the Great Creator and Preserver of the Universe. And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshiping God in the manner and seasons most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession, or sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship.

Part I, Article 3. As the happiness of a people, and good order and preservation of civil government, essentially depend upon piety, religion, and morality; and as these cannot be generally diffused throughout the community, but they the institution of a public worship of God, and of public institutions in piety, religion, and morality; therefore, to promote their happiness, and to secure the good order and preservation of their government, the people of this commonwealth have a right to invest their legislature with power to authorize and require, and the legislature shall, from time to time, authorize and require, the several towns, parishes, precincts, and other bodies politic, or religious societies, to make suitable provision, at their own expense, for the institution of the public worship of God, and of the support and maintenance of public protestant teachers of piety, religion, and morality in all cases, where suchprovision shall not be made voluntarily.

All the people of the commonwealth have a right to, and do, invest their legislature, with authority to enjoin upon all the subjects an attendance upon the instructions of public teachers, as foresaid, at stated times and seasons, if there be anyone whose instructions they cannot conscientiously and conveniently attend:— Provided, notwithstanding, that the several towns, parishes, precincts, and other bodies politic, or religious societies, shall, at all times, have the exclusive right of electing their public teachers, and contract with them for their support and maintenance.

All monies paid by the subject to the support of public worship, and of public teachers aforesaid, shall, if he require it, be uniformly applied to the subject of the public teacher or teachers of his own religious sect or denomination, provided there be any, on whose instructions he attends; otherwise it may be paid towards the support of the teacher or teachers of the parish or precinct in which the said monies are raised.

And every denomination of Christians, demeaning themselves peaceably, and as good subjects of the commonwealth, shall be equally under the protection of the law; and no subordination of any sect or denomination to another shall ever be established by law.

Part I, Article 18. A frequent recurrence to the fundamental principles of the Constitution, and a constant adherence to those of piety, justice, moderation, temperance, industry, and frugality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the advantages of liberty, and to maintain a free government. The people ought, consequently, to have a particular attention to all those principles, in the choice of their officers and representatives, they shall have the right, to require of their lawgivers, and magistrates, an exact and constant observance of them, in the formation and execution of all laws necessary for the good administration of the commonwealth.

Chapter VI, Article I Any person chosen governor or lieutenant–governor, counselor, senator or representative, and accepting the trust, shall, before he proceed to execute the duties of his place or office, make and subscribe the declaration, viz.

I, ___________, do declare that I believe the Christian religion, and have a firm persuasion of its truth; and that I am seized and possessed, in my own right, of the property required by the Constitution, as one qualification to the office or place to which I am elected.


Michigan — 1908

We, the people of the State of Michigan, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of freedom ... establish this Constitution ...


Minnesota — 1857

We, the people of the State of Minnesota, grateful to God for our civil and religious liberty, and desiring to perpetuate its blessings ...


Mississippi — 1833

We, the people of Mississippi in convention assembled, grateful to Almighty God, and invoking His blessing on our work ...

Article I, Sec. 3. The exercise of religious profession and worship, without discrimination, shall for ever be free to all persons in this state: provided that the right hereby declared and established shall not be so construed as to excuse acts of licentiousness, or justify practices inconsistent with the peace and safety of the state.

Article I, Sec. 4. No preference shall ever be given by law to any religious sect, or mode of worship.

Article I, Sec. 5. That no person shall be molested for his opinions on any subject whatever, nor suffer any civil or political incapacity, or acquire any civil or political advantage, in consequence of such opinions, except in cases provided for in this constitution.

Article VII, Sec. 5. No person who denies the being of a God, or a future state of rewards and punishment, shall hold any office in the civil department of this state.

Article VII, Sec. 14. Religion, morality, and knowledge, being necessary to good government, the preservation of liberty, and the happiness of mankind, schools, and the means of education, shall for ever be encouraged in this state.

Article VII, Sec. 15. Divorces from the bonds of matrimony shall not be granted, but in cases provided for by law, but suit in chancery.


Missouri — 1820

We, the people of Missouri, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, and grateful for His goodness ... establish this Constitution ...

Article XIII, Sec. 4. That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences; that no man can be compelled to erect, support, or attend any place of worship, or to maintain any minister of the Gospel or teacher of religion; that no human authority can control or interfere with the rights on conscience; that no person can ever be hurt, molested, or restrained in his religious profession, or sentiments, if he does not disturb others in their religious worship.

Article XIII, Sec. 5. That no person, on account of his religious opinions, can be rendered ineligible to any office of trust or profit under this state; that no preference can every be given by law to any sect or mode of worship; and that no religious corporation can ever be established in this state.

Article XIII, Sec. 18. That no person who is religiously scrupulous of bearing arms can be compelled to do so, but may be compelled to pay an equivalent for military service, in such manner as shall be prescribed by law,; and that no priest, preacher of the Gospel, or teacher of any religious persuasion or sect, regularly ordained as such, be subject to militia duty, or compelled to bear arms.


Montana — 1889

We, the people of Montana, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of liberty ... establish this Constitution ...


Nebraska — 1875

We, the people, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom ... establish this Constitution ...


Nevada — 1864

We the people of the State of Nevada, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom ... establish this Constitution ...


New Hampshire — 1792

Part I, Article 6 As morality and piety, rightly grounded on evangelical principles, will give the best and greatest security to government, and will lay, in the hearts of men, the strongest obligations to due subjection; and as the knowledge of these is most likely to be propagated through a society by the institution of the public worship of the Deity, and of public instruction in morality and religion; therefore, to promote these important purposes, the people of this state have a right to empower, and do hereby fully empower, their legislature, to authorize, from time to time, the several towns, parishes, bodies corporate, or religious societies, within this state, to make adequate provision at their own expense, for the support and maintenance of public protestant teachers of piety, religion and morality:

Provided notwithstanding, that the several towns, parishes, bodies corporate or religious societies, shall at all times, have the exclusive right of electing their own public teachers, and of contracting with them for their support and maintenance: And no person, of any one particular religious sect or denomination, shall ever be compelled to pay towards the support of the teacher or teachers of another persuasion, sect. or denomination.

And every denomination of Christians,demeaning themselves quietly, and as good citizens of the state, shall be under the equal protection of the law: and no subordination of any one sect or denomination to another, shall ever be established by law.

And nothing herein shall be understood to affect any former contracts made for the support of the ministry; but all such contracts shall remain, and shall be in the same state, as if this Constitution had not been made.

Part I, Article 38. A frequent recurrence to the fundamental principles of the Constitution, and a constant adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, industry, and frugality, and all the social virtues, are indispensibly necessary to preserve the blessings of liberty and good government. The people ought, therefore, to have a particular regard to all those principles, in the choice of their officers and representatives: and they have the right, to require of their lawgivers, and magistrates, an exact and constant observance of them, in the formation and execution of the laws necessary for the good administration of the government.


New Jersey — 1777

We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to Almighty God for civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing on our endeavors

Article 18 That no person, shall ever within this colony, be deprived of the inestimable privilege of worshipping Almighty God in a manner agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience: nor under any pretense whatever, be compelled to attend any place of worship, contrary to his own faith and judgment; nor shall any person in this colony ever be obliged to pay tithes, taxes, or any other rates, for the purposes of building or repairing any other church or churches, places or places of worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or ministry, contrary to what he believes to be right, or has deliberately and voluntarily engaged himself to perform.

Article 19. That there shall be no establishment of any one religious sect in this province in preference to another; and that no protestant inhabitant of this colony shall be denied the enjoyment of any civil right, merely on account of his religious principle; but that all persons professing a belief in the faith of any protestant sect, who shall demean themselves peaceably under the government, as hereby established, shall be capable of being elected into any office of profit, or trust, or being a member of either branch of the legislature, and shall fully and freely enjoy every privilege and immunity enjoyed by others their fellow subjects.


New Mexico — 1911

We, the People of New Mexico, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of liberty ...


New York — 1846

We, the people of the State of New York, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, in order to secure its blessings ...


North Carolina — 1776

We the people of the State of North Carolina, grateful to Almighty God, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for ... our civil, political, and religious liberties, and acknowledging our dependence upon Him for the continuance of those ...

Section 32. That no person who shall deny the being of God, or the truth of the protestant religion, or the Divine authority of the Old or New Testaments, or who shall hold religious principles incompatible with the freedom and safety of the state, shall be capable of holding any office, or place of trust or profit, in the civil department within this state.

Article IV, Section 2. The thirty second of the Constitution shall be amended to read as follows: No person who shall deny the being of God, or the truth of the Christian religion, or the Divine authority of the Old or New Testaments, or who shall hold religious principles incompatible with the freedom and safety of the state, shall be capable of holding any office, or place of trust or profit, in the civil department within this state.

Section 34. That there shall be no establishment of any one religious church or denomination in this state, in preference to any other; neither shall any person, on any pretense whatsoever, be compelled to attend any place of worship contrary to his own faith or judgment, nor be obliged to pay for the purchase of any glebe [Church land] or the building of any house of worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or ministry, contrary to what he believes right, or has voluntarily and personally engaged to perform; but all persons shall be at liberty to exercise their own mode of worship: Provided that nothing herein contained that be construed to exempt preachers of treasonable or seditious discourses, from legal trial and punishment.

Right 19 That all men have a natural and unalienable right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own conscience.

Right 21 That a frequent reccurence to fundamental principles is absolutely necessary to the preserve the blessings of liberty.


North Dakota — 1889

We, the people of North Dakota, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of civil and religious liberty, do ordain...


Ohio — 1802

We the people of the state of Ohio, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings and to promote our common ...

Article VIII, Sec 3. That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own conscience; that no man shall be compelled to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry, against his consent; and that no preference shall ever be given by law to any religious society or mode of worship: and that no religious test shall be required as a qualification to any office or trust or profit. But religion, morality, and knowledge, being essentially necessary to the government, and the happiness of mankind, schools, and the means of instruction, shall for ever be encouraged by legislative provision, not inconsistent with the rights of conscience.


Oklahoma — 1907

Invoking the guidance of Almighty God, in order to secure and perpetuate the blessing of liberty; to secure just and rightful government; to promote our mutual welfare and happiness, we, the people of the State of Oklahoma, do ordain and establish this Constitution


Oregon — 1857

Article I. Section 2. All men shall be secure in the Natural right, to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their consciences ...


Pennsylvania — 1838

We, the people of Pennsylvania, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of civil and religious liberty, and humbly invoking His guidance ...

Article IX, Sec. 4. That no person who acknowledges the being of a God and a future state of rewards and punishments, shall, on account of his religious sentiments, be disqualified to hold any office or place of trust or profit under this commonwealth.


Rhode Island — 1842

We the People of the State of Rhode Island ... grateful to Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing ...

 Paragraph 4 That no person within said colony, at any time hereafter, shall be anywise molested, punished, disquieted, or called in question, for any differences in opinion in matters of religion, who do not actually disturb the civil peace of our said colony; but that all and every person and persons may, from time to time, and at all times hereafter, freely and fully have and enjoy his own and their judgments and consciences, throughout the tract of land hereafter mentioned, they behaving themselves, peaceably and quietly, and not using this liberty to licentiousness and profaneness, nor to the civil injury or outward disturbance of others; any laws, statute, or clause therein contained, or to be contained, usage, or custom of the realm, to the contrary hereof, in any wise notwithstanding.

 Paragraph 5 And that they may be in the better capacity to defend themselves, in their just rights and liberties, against all the enemies of the Christian faith, and others, in all respects, we have further thought fit....


South Carolina — 1808

We, the people of the State of South Carolina ... grateful to God for our liberties, do ordain and establish this Constitution ...

Article I, Section 23. And whereas the ministers of the Gospel are, by their profession, dedicated to the service of God and the care of souls, and ought not to be diverted from the great duties of their functions: therefore, no minister of the Gospel, or public preacher, of any religious persuasion, whilst he continues in the exercise of his pastoral functions, shall be eligible to the office of governor, lieutenant–governor, or a seat in the senate or house of representatives.

Article VIII, Sec. 1 The free exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship, without discrimination or preference shall, for ever hereafter, be allowed within this state to all mankind: Provided that the liberty of conscience thereby declared, shall not be so construed as to excuse acts of licentiousness, or justify practices inconsistent with the peace or safety of this state


South Dakota — 1889

We, the people of South Dakota, grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious liberties ... establish this Constitution ...


Tennessee — 1796

Article IX, Sec. 2.  No person who denies the being of a God, or a future state of rewards and punishments, shall hold any office in the civil department of this state.


Texas — 1845

We the People of the Republic of Texas, acknowledging, with gratitude, the grace and beneficence of God ...


Utah — 1896

Grateful to Almighty God for life and liberty, we ... establish this Constitution ...


Vermont — 1793

Whereas all government ought to ... enable the individuals who compose it to enjoy their natural rights, and other blessings which the Author of Existence has bestowed on man ...

Chapter I, Article 3. That all men have natural and unalienable right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences and understandings, as in their opinion shall be regulated by the Word of God; and that no man ought to, or of right can, be compelled to attend any religious worship, or erect or support any place of worship, or maintain any minister, contrary to the dictates of his conscience; nor can any man be justly deprived or abridged of any civil right as a citizen, on account of his religious sentiments or peculiar mode of religious worship; and that no authority can or ought to be vested in, or assumed by, any power whatever, that shall in any case interfere with, or in any manner control, the rights of conscience and the free exercise of religious worship. Nevertheless, every sect or denomination of Christians ought to observe the Sabbath, Lord's Day, and keep up some sort of religious worship, which to them shall seem most agreeable to the revealed will of God.

Chapter I, Article 18. A frequent recurrence to the fundamental principles, and firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, industry, and frugality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the blessings of liberty and keep government free; the people ought, therefore, to pay particular attention to these points, in the choice of officers and representatives, and have the right, in a legal way, to exact a due and constant regard for them, from their legislators, and magistrates, in making and executing such laws as are necessary for the good government of the state.

Chapter II, Section 41. Laws for the encouragement of virtue and prevention of vice and immorality, ought to be constantly kept in force and duly executed: and a competent number of schools ought to be maintained in each town, for the convenient instruction of youth; and one or more grammar schools be incorporated, and properly supported, in each county in this state. And all religious societies or bodies of men that may be hereafter united or incorporated for the advancement of religion and learning, or for other pious and charitable purposes, shall be encouraged and protected in the enjoyment of the privileges , immunities, and estates, which they in justice ought to enjoy, under such regulations as the General Assembly of this state shall direct.


Virginia — 1788

Right 16. That religion, or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence; and therefore all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance and love, and charity towards each other.


Washington — 1889

We the People of the State of Washington, grateful to the Supreme Ruler of the Universe for our liberties, do ordain this Constitution ...


West Virginia — 1872

Since through Divine Providence we enjoy the blessings of civil, political and religious liberty, we, the people of West Virginia ... reaffirm our faith in and constant reliance upon God ...


Wisconsin — 1848

We, the people of Wisconsin, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, domestic tranquility ...


Wyoming — 1890

We, the people of the State of Wyoming, grateful to God for our civil, political, and religious liberties ... establish this Constitution ...


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